Staying fit and active is an important part of maintaining our overall health, Dr. Matthew Negaard, Sports Medicine Physician and Emergency Medicine Physician of Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics emphasizes. In fact, exercise allows us to:

But aren't arthritic patients advised to avoid putting too much stress on their joints?

Yes, Negaard answers, but there are many forms of exercise that are low-impact, including biking, swimming, water aerobics, walking on the treadmill or elliptical, rowing and yoga. Most studies suggest, he adds, that even running does not appear to accelerate the progress of osteoarthritis, so long as you allow adequate rest between runs.

Low-impact training provides all the cardiovascular benefits of exercise without placing stress on your joints, assisting in active recovery and improving blood flow and circulation to the muscles, the American College of Sports Medicine explains. What's more, the benefits are not limited to the physical - one important result of exercise is the management of anxiety and depression. "Every adult should perform activities that maintain or increase muscular strength and endurance for a minimum of two days per week, the CDC recommends.

For those with arthritis, low-impact activity is encouraged. If pain or injury is holding you back from regular activity, let the experts at Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics help. Request an appointment now.

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