Welcome to the 18th Annual Brady Sports Achievement Awards presented by Physicians Rehab Solution and hosted by the Forté Orthopedic Research Institute. The Brady Lifetime Achievement Award is named after Dr. Thomas A. Brady, known as the father of sports medicine in Central Indiana. Dr. Brady developed many innovative techniques for returning athletes to their sports quickly and safely. All proceeds from the annual event will help support the Forté Orthopedic Research Institute in our mission to lead advances in orthopedic care and sports medicine through research and education to enhance quality of life.

Wednesday, April 19, 2023
Lucas Oil Stadium Plaza

Questions? Please contact:
Mo Barkley, Director of Philanthropy
Phone (317) 313-3128
Email mo@forteinstitute.org

The Foundation embraces a crucial long-term role in the advancement of orthopedic medicine. The Brady Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes individuals who, through their connection to Indiana, have made outstanding contributions in the field of athletics and have consistently demonstrated the ideals of sportsmanship over many seasons during their lives. The Brady Awards honor high school and college athletes who have overcome an injury or hardship with a special scholarship award. In addition, the Indiana High School Athletic Association (IHSAA) selects Hoosier scholar-athletes and recognizes them for their academic accomplishments, hard work, and dedication within their chosen sports.

NOMINATION FORM

CARMEL, Ind. (January 5, 2023): Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, previously known as Methodist Sports Medicine, announces the election of a new board president and officers, effective as of Jan. 1, 2023. Dr. Jonathan Smerek now serves as president of the medical group, with Dr. Dale Snead serving as vice president and Dr. Joseph Maratt serving as secretary and treasurer.

Smerek, a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle reconstruction, brings vast experience to his new leadership role, including serving as a team physician in which he works as part of a highly collaborative group taking care of athletes. Before being elected president, Smerek served one term as vice president of Forté.

“I’m honored to have been selected to lead Forté and to keep building on all of the great achievements we’ve had during our 40 years of service to the community,” said Smerek. “I firmly believe that, like an athletic team, each member of a medical group contributes to the overall success of the organization. My main priority as president will be working with all team members to grow our practice and build out our centers of excellence in each specialty to continue to be a go-to for orthopedic care in Central Indiana and beyond.”

Smerek succeeds Dr. Mark Ritter, who served as Forté’s president for eight years and continues to serve the medical group as a physician. Ritter, one of three team physicians for the Indianapolis Colts, is a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in orthopedic sports medicine, trauma, and knee and shoulder injuries. During Ritter’s tenure as president, Forté underwent a rebranding process, opened both a new clinic and a new orthopedic specialty hospital in Carmel, advanced its urgent care program, and added two new surgeons, among other successes.

“Dr. Ritter’s support of Forté, its physicians and staff has been steadfast, requiring many hours outside of his patient schedule and family time,” said Marty Rosenberg, CEO of Forté. “We will be forever grateful for his leadership, which not only continued the legacy Forté has established as one of the country’s original sports medicine practices but also built upon it.”

To learn more about Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, its services, and its accomplished team of physicians and staff, visit forteortho.com.

About Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics

Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, previously known as Methodist Sports Medicine, is an independent, physician-owned orthopedic practice recognized as one of the region’s most respected orthopedic groups. Founded in 1983 as one of the country’s original sports medicine practices, Forté’s physicians and staff provide comprehensive, specialized sports medicine and orthopedic care to patients of all ages.

Clinical evaluations performed by highly skilled fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons, combined with advanced surgical techniques and comprehensive non-surgical treatment options, provide patients with exceptional treatment outcomes and a return to active living. Forté provides patients with expert orthopedic care in several sub-specialties, including hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder; foot and ankle; hip and knee; joint replacement and revision; spine care and sports medicine. Forté has been trusted by the Indianapolis Colts as their official team physicians since 1983 and serve as the orthopedic provider for Purdue University, Butler University, Indiana State University and numerous high schools and public safety departments throughout central Indiana.

Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics also innovates daily through a separate 501(c)(3), Forté Orthopedic Research Institute, that improves the lives of patients everywhere through advanced clinical research and education.

Bloomington’s Mike Conklin is the kind of guy who will let the store manager know about the service he’s received.

Good service, that is.

“If I go into a Target or Wal-Mart and one of the employees treats me well, I’ll ask to see their supervisor,” Conklin says. “The employee will get nervous and worried that I’m going to complain. Instead, I want to let their supervisor know how well I was treated.”

That’s the man’s personality. And that’s the reason he reached out to Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics to let them know his ongoing satisfaction with the care he’s received at the Bloomington clinic.

In particular, from Dr. Rick Weidenbener and Dr. Gary Gettelfinger.

“Neither one of them are looking for attention,” says Conklin. “But the passion for what they do and the personal attention they provide is special and deserves to be recognized.”

But first, the back story which is, the back story. Conklin’s aching back, that is. He’s 68, now retired after a career in teaching and coaching except for a current fifth grade basketball coaching gig in Bloomington. But he still considers himself an athlete, albeit an elderly one.

In his younger days, he played football and baseball in high school. He was good enough to pitch a couple of years of college ball. He graduated from Northern Illinois University and went into teaching health and physical education as well as coaching baseball and basketball. The journey took him from Fort Wayne to Vincennes and eventually to Eastern (Greene) High School, where he was the varsity baseball coach.

It was there that Conklin’s insistence on pitching batting practice – in concert with his disdain of a pitching machine – eventually took a toll on his back, resulting in a herniated disc.

That led him to Bloomington Bone and Joint – now Forté – and Drs. Weidenbener and Gettelfinger. Weidenbener prescribed stretches and exercises. Gettelfinger specialized in pain management.

What both did was stay in contact throughout his treatment. It wasn’t here-today-gone-tomorrow treatment.

Their care and attention were necessary because, well, Conklin had other pursuits, such as running marathons and, oh, climbing a mountain in Colorado.

He wasn’t about to back off, pun intended, with special regard to a running event in Memphis: The St Jude Memphis Marathon Weekend.

He signed up in early September to run the half marathon, but as he prepared for the race, his back began to increase in pain and was forced to stop training in early November. The pain was excruciating,” Conklin said.

Two weeks before the December 5th race he visited Dr. Weidenbener. “Weidenbener examined him and did an MRI the next day. Treatment required an epidural from Gettelfinger.

“It was like magic,” Conklin said. “I was cured.”

Not in the best cardiovascular shape, Conklin nonetheless traveled to Memphis and completed the 5K.

“I was gassed,” he said. “But the money raised goes to those wonderful children. And as you near the finish you go past the hospital and you see all those children saying thank you. And that makes it worth it.”

Oh, and that mountain climb. He credits Weidenbener and Gettelfinger for helping him be physically able to do that. It was Longs Peak, 14,259 at the summit. “I always wanted to climb a mountain because I’m afraid of heights,” said Conklin. “It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life and it took me eight hours to reach the summit.”

Without question, the Forté duo was with him at the top.

“Rick is Mr. Compassionate,” says Conklin. “Gary’s got this tough, gruff exterior but inside he has a huge heart. Every now and then, they will call just to see how I’m doing. Like I said, when people do a great job, I want to let the people in charge know.”

Mission accomplished.

The Indianapolis Colts today announced that Cory Robinson of Seymour (Ind.) has been named the second-ever Colts High School Man of the Year award, presented by Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics.

It's bad news when, due to athletic injury, trauma or simply aging, the protective cartilage between our bones starts to wear away, causing joint pain, stiffness and swelling. Osteoarthritis can affect any of the joints in the body, but since our feet and ankles support our entire body weight, ankle arthritis can have a severe impact. In fact, as we move, our ankles are first to absorb shock. And, while there may not be signs of an immediate emergency, lingering or chronic pain - which may come from the ankle but manifest itself in the legs, hips, or spine - should always be checked out by a specialist.

For patients with ankle arthritis, even merely walking on uneven ground or climbing stairs can pose a painful challenge. Now, though, advancements in technology have made ankle replacement a viable option for many, Dr. Andrew Wohler explains. Not only can replacement surgery preserve some motion at the ankle joint, if can effectively reduce the pain associated with arthritis.  

Still, surgery is never the first choice. More conservative measures must be exhausted first, including:

In the event these other measures have failed to reduce pain and return the patient to function, ankle arthroplasty is one of the surgical options that may be recommended. And, while no surgery is without complication or risk, recent data show that 90% of implants are surviving ten years without need for revision.

At Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, Dr. Wohler uses Wright Medical/Stryker's broad line of implants, using a CT scan to produce patient-specific cutting jigs "tailor-made" to fit the dimensions of the patient's foot. The aptly named the "Prophecy Protocol" uses both the individual patient's data and the surgeon's preferences to help a prototyping machine produce "guides" and engineered implant components. The machine creates "guides" to set the location of cuts. This technology, as Wright perfectly describes it, is the gold standard for end-stage ankle arthritis.

At Forté, advanced engineering and orthopedic expertise combine to enable patient-specific ankle implant surgery for better outcomes and lives free of ankle arthritis.

When runners experience injury and pain, the blame usually rests squarely on biomechanics, Jen Lebeau, head of Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics' Run Fit program explains. In fact, at each of the five Forté locations, a specially trained physical therapist evaluates patients' particular muscle strength and length, checking joint angles at various phases of gait.

No stranger to running herself, Lebeau has completed multiple 5K,10K and half marathons, along with the Twin Cities Marathon. At running stores around the area, Jennifer has offered presentations and injury checks, all the while keeping her own knowledge fresh through continuing education courses.

The two important tools used at Run Fit include two elements:

1. Treadmills - the Alter G™ and Hydroworx™ are particularly helpful for:

2. Sparkmotion™ software for video analysis of biomechanical issues

For runners sidelined with an orthopedic injury, the situation can be both painful and frustrating. At Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, you should expect a thorough orthopedic evaluation and to leave with a set of exercises that address the biomechanical impairments causing the injury.

Success stories abound. Lebeau treated one runner who developed a quad strain after a 30-mile race. Walking on uneven ground, climbing stairs, biking and running all caused pain. Six weeks following an evaluation, Lebeau was able to do a treadmill gait analysis using Sparkmotion™ software. Within two months, the athlete was able to return to running pain-free.

Whether you are training for a race, recovering from cross country and prepping for spring track or wanting to run more recreationally, the RunFit crew at Forte will be ready with treadmills and technology

Foot health is often a major issue for people experiencing extreme poverty and homelessness here in Indiana and around the world. The Forté Orthopedic Research Institute (FORI) welcomes news media to the return of its Hearts 2 Soles event, presented in partnership with the Indianapolis Colts and Wheeler Mission, which will be held for the first time since 2019 to raise awareness about the importance of proper foot health as an essential part of everyday life.

WHO:               Forté Orthopedic Research Institute, in partnership with the Indianapolis Colts and Wheeler Mission

WHAT:             Hearts 2 Soles is an event providing free foot exams, shoes and socks to those in need in our community. In addition to the generous support provided by the Indianapolis Colts and Wheeler Mission, Hearts 2 Soles is made possible by donations of 300 pairs of shoes provided by Dr. Comfort/Enovis and Red Wing Shoes, 300 pairs of socks supplied by JD Sports, and 300 toiletry kits prepared by Meijer.

WHEN:             Tuesday, Dec. 6

Please Note: We kindly ask media to refrain from showing the faces of those taking part in the Hearts 2 Soles event. Subjects should be blurred or filmed in a way as to protect identity.

WHERE:           Wheeler Mission, Shelter for Men

             520 E. Market St.

             Indianapolis, IN 46204

PLANNING YOUR ARRIVAL: Media interested in attending Hearts 2 Soles should contact Malia McGovern at mmcgovern@forteortho.com onsite or ahead of the event. Parking is available on the east side of Wheeler Mission at Market St. and Park Ave.

###

Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, previously known as Methodist Sports Medicine, is an independent, physician-owned orthopedic practice recognized as one of the region’s most respected orthopedic groups. Founded in 1983 as one of the country’s original sports medicine practices, Forté’s physicians and staff provide comprehensive, specialized sports medicine and orthopedic care to patients of all ages.

Clinical evaluations performed by highly skilled fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons, combined with advanced surgical techniques and comprehensive non-surgical treatment options, provide patients with exceptional treatment outcomes and a return to active living. Forté provides patients with expert orthopedic care in several sub-specialties, including hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder; foot and ankle; hip and knee; joint replacement and revision; spine care and sports medicine. Forté has been trusted by the Indianapolis Colts as their official team physicians since 1983 and serve as the orthopedic provider for Purdue University, Butler University, Indiana State University and numerous high schools and public safety departments throughout central Indiana.

Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics also innovates daily through a separate 501(c)(3), Forté Orthopedic Research Institute, that improves the lives of patients everywhere through advanced clinical research and education.

INDIANAPOLIS – Franciscan Health has entered a three-year partnership with Roncalli High School to provide sports medicine services.

Franciscan Health will provide athletic trainers to the school for daily medical coverage of athletic programs and services. The athletic trainers will work alongside Seth Schmoll, DO, Franciscan Health Sports Medicine, who will serve as the head team physician to the Roncalli Royals. Fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon Andrew Wohler, MD, of Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, will serve as orthopedic consultant, and Tony Origer, sports chiropractor with Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics will support teams as needed. 

“We are excited to partner with Roncalli High School. At Franciscan Health, our sports medicine services are specifically geared to meet the needs of student-athletes,” said James Callaghan, MD, president and CEO of Franciscan Health Central Indiana. “Our team is passionate about preventing and treating sports injuries and maximizing each student athlete’s potential both on and off the field.”

"Roncalli High School is excited to partner with Franciscan Health Sports Medicine,” said Roncalli President Chuck Weisenbach.  “As two of the southside's premier entities, we will work collaboratively not only to ensure excellence to all entrusted to our care but also to work diligently to form Disciples of Jesus Christ."

Franciscan Health Sports Medicine is led by physician specialists and surgeons who are specially trained to treat sports-related injuries in children and adults. Its expertise includes:

By Bill Benner, Sports Journalist

This is a hip hip hooray story.

Literally.

Hip for a first successful hip replacement. Hip for a second.

And hooray that a young student-athlete and his parents found the doctor at Forté Sports Medicine and Orthopedics who put years of puzzlement and pain in the rear-view mirror.

That doctor was Forte’s Lucian “Luke” Warth. The student-athlete was 17-year-old Jackson Tetrick, then a rising junior on the tennis team at Decatur Central High School.

The story goes back a decade when young Jackson was 6 and began playing youth soccer.

“Afterward, he always complained that he was hurting,” says his mother, Melissa. “Even as he got into high school, he still had issues and even had pain when he was walking.”

The pain, specifically, was in Jackson’s hips. His mother, Melissa, and father, Chris – began a search for answers, first to a pediatrician, then to a sports medicine doctor, then to another physician.

“That doctor came into the exam room with the x-rays and said Jackson had double hip dysplasia. He said he could do the surgery, but it was only a 50 percent chance it would work,” Melissa said.

Hip dysplasia, in layman’s terms, is when the femoral ball does not fit properly into the socket of the hip.

Thus, with the diagnosis came another referral … this time to Dr. Warth at Forté in the summer of 2021. Warth did the first hip replacement in June that allowed Jackson to play junior-year tennis. His second hip replacement followed in November.

“Jackson had very complex and unique anatomy of his pelvis which made the surgery more difficult,” said Dr. Warth. “But I was confident that with well-done total hip replacements, he would bounce back quickly and improve dramatically.”

Which is precisely what occurred. Within weeks from the second surgery, Jackson was back on the tennis court, first assisting the girls’ team and then resuming his own playing career.

“It’s been an amazing experience the last two years,” said Chris, Jackson’s father. “Dr. Warth and the staff were a wonderful group of people. As soon as you walk in, you could sense the professionalism and caring both for Jackson and us, his family. And they were very confident he would fully recover.”

“Jackson was understandably nervous,” said Melissa. “But their attitude was, ‘Look, we got you. We will get you through this.’ “

“I’m just so excited that Jackson can be a kid again,” said Dr. Warth. “He couldn’t walk. He couldn’t run. He couldn’t play tennis. I was a baseball player as a teenager. I can’t imagine that being taken away. More importantly, he’s going to need those hips for another 70 years.”

More immediately, Jackson will be back playing for his school, at No. 2 singles when the season returns. And when he’s not playing, he will be announcing, serving as the play-by-play voice for Decatur Central games on the school’s streaming network, DCHS Live. He will pursue that career next fall when he enrolls in Ball State University’s media school. Someday, he hopes to be on ESPN or Fox Sports.

And, who knows, perhaps his signature call will be … Hip, Hip, Hooray!

IMPORTANT: We are experiencing technical outages which are impacting our Billing Department’s ability to communicate with patients.  We apologize for this inconvenience.  For billing inquiries, please complete our contact form.

linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram